Money in Politics

About

CED believes that the success of American democracy depends on fair and impartial courts, along with a more engaged electorate and transparent campaign finance system. CED conducts research and puts forth policy solutions that address the role of hidden money, foster greater citizen participation in elections, and insulate state courts from political influence.

Through state and national polling, CED gauges business leaders’ perspectives about the role of money in politics and bipartisan reforms for policymakers to enact. Across the country, Members speak at policy forums and to state and national lawmakers about the importance of reform toimprove trust in our democratic institutions.

Recent Activity

 

 

 

Report by Brennan Center explores small donor public financing as a way to elevate diverse voices in campaigns

The increasingly dominant role of mega-donors in funding American elections marginalizes the voices of those without access to wealthy donors or independent wealth. But as more than 20 state and local elected officials from all branches of government in 11 states and 6 cities explain in Breaking Down Barriers: The Faces of Public Financing, public financing systems can help elevate diverse voices and eliminate barriers that prevent diverse candidates from successfully running for office.

News Report: https://www.brennancenter.org/publication/breaking-down-barriers-faces-small-donor-public-financing

Full Report PDF: https://www.brennancenter.org/sites/default/files/publications/Faces_of_Public_Financing.pdf

Judicial Selection: An Interactive Map

Approximately 95 percent of all cases in the United States are filed in state courts. State court judges decide cases that touch on virtually every aspect of Americans’ lives, from school funding to the rights of the accused. Because state courts have a profound impact on the country’s legal and policy landscape, choosing state court judges is a consequential decision. And, in recent decades, judicial selection has become increasingly politicized, polarized, and dominated by special interests — particularly but not exclusively in the 39 states that use elections to choose at least some of their judges.

Brennan Center for Justice, Judicial Selection: An Interactive Map

Money in Politics

Research

Blogs & Media

Additional Resources

Infographic: Judicial Selection Reform

Microsite: Crony Capitalism, New Mexico

Partners





Subcommittee Co-Chairs

  • Robert J. Kueppers
    Senior Partner, Global Regulatory & Public Policy
    Deloitte LLP (Ret.)

  • Donald K. Peterson
    Chairman and Chief Executive Officer (Retired)
    Avaya Inc.

  • Jane Sherburne
    Principal
    Sherburne PLLC